Learn about CBD (Cannabidiol)


 

-Relieves Pain and Inflammation. Among common CBD benefits, natural pain relief tops the list for many. ...

-Has Antipsychotic Effects. ...
-Reduces Anxiety. ...
-Helps to Fight Cancer. ...
-Relieves Nausea. ...
-May Treat Seizures and Other Neurological Disorders. ...
-Lowers Incidence of Diabetes. ...
-Promotes Cardiovascular Health.

Cannabidiol

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cannabidiol (INN;[3] abbreviated as: CBD) is one of at least 113 active cannabinoids identified in cannabis.[4][5] It is a major phytocannabinoid, accounting for up to 40% of the plant's extract.[6]

CBD does not appear to have any psychoactive effects such as those caused by tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and it may have a downregulating impact on disordered thinking and anxiety.[7]

 

Medical uses

Pain associated with multiple sclerosis

Nabiximols (USAN, trade name Sativex) is an aerosolized mist for oral administration containing a near 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC. The drug was approved by Canadian authorities in 2005 to alleviate pain associated with multiple sclerosis.[8][9]

Research

Addiction treatment

In 2015 a case study on CBD and addictive use of marijuana was published. A bipolar man who had a daily marijuana habit was given CBD along with his regimen of medication and reported less anxiety and no marijuana use.[10] A 2015 systematic review of studies on CBD and addiction (five on humans, nine on animals) found that CBD acts on neurotransmittors involved in addiction; animal studies showed some relation in opioid and psychostimulant addiction and human studies showed beneficial effects for tobacco and cannabis dependence. However, the anti-addictive properties displayed might be due to CBD's protective effect on stress and neurotoxicity, the review also mentions the need for more research.[11]

Anti-inflammatory

A number of studies on CBD indicate that it may be useful in treating inflammation caused by a variety of conditions. A 2012 study published in the European Journal of Pharmacology concluded that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A2A receptor.[12] Another 2012 study found similar anti-inflammatory effects from an even smaller dose of CBD when treating acute pancreatitis in mice.[13] These conclusions support the findings of earlier studies like a 2006 investigation of CBD that found it could be used effectively as an oral therapeutic agent for chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.[14]

Epilepsy

Anecdotal reports and early studies suggested that CBD may be of value in treating epilepsy, but the quality of the studies was too poor to draw definitive conclusions.[15][16] A 2014 Cochrane review included four randomized controlled trials, but all were of poor quality.[17] A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study of CBD oil on treating Dravet syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy that begins in infancy and is difficult to treat,[18] was conducted in 2017 and found that CBD oil significantly reduced the number of seizures. However, it also caused increased diarrhea, vomiting, fevers, fatigue, abnormal LFTs, and somnolence.[19]

GW Pharmaceuticals is seeking FDA approval to market a liquid formulation of pure plant-derived CBD, under the trade name Epidiolex (containing 99% cannabidiol and less than 0.10% Δ9-THC) as a treatment for Dravet syndrome. Epidiolex was granted fast-track status[20][21][22] and orphan drug status in the United States for treatment of Dravet syndrome in July 2015.[23][24]

Adverse effects

CBD safety in humans has been studied in multiple small studies, suggesting that it is well tolerated at doses of up to 1,500 mg/day given orally or 30 mg given intravenously.[25] Daily doses of CBD (700 mg) for 6 weeks did not induce any toxicity in patients being treated for Huntington's disease.[26]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabidiol

Cannabinoids appear to be of therapeutic value as antiemetics, antispasmodics, analgesics and appetite stimulants and may have potential uses in epilepsy, glaucoma and asthma. Scientific evidence for any of these indications, except for antiemetic effects, is extremely sparse and claims for clinical utility are largely based on anecdotal reports. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of any of the therapeutic effects are unknown. This paper reviews the clinical trials which have been carried out with cannabinoids including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and synthetic cannabinoids such as nabilone and levonantradol, and discusses the advantages and adverse effects of cannabinoids in clinical use. The place of cannabinoids in modern medicine remains to be properly evaluated, but present evidence suggests that they could be valuable, particularly as adjuvants, for symptom control in a range of conditions for which standard drugs are not fully satisfactory.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20575778